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School of Public Health News

Loma Linda Research of San Bernardino Rail Yard Featured in Journal

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Dr. Rhonda Spencer-Hwang

The Pipeline Effect

Every year Loma Linda offers pipeline program for local minority students. The goal is to bridge the gap between our overwhelmingly ethnically diverse California population and the somewhat homogenous health care profession population. Throughout the last three summers I’ve had the opportunity to connect with over a hundred low-income minority high school students. While most of the students come from local area high schools and are Latino or African American, we always receive a few Native American students from across the country. It’s these students that have impacted me the most.

Study Finds Social Determinants of Physical Activity among Adult Asian-Americans

A study of more than 4,000 Asian-Americans in Southern California out of Loma Linda University School of Public Health has found that physical activity among six major Asian-American subgroups (Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Korean) is affected by social determinants in each group. Previous studies have been done to identify determinants of physical activity in the U.S., but the majority of this research focuses on the general U.S. population, either excluding Asian-Americans or combining diverse populations into one homogenous group.

Tell Me About Your Scars

Scars and bruises fascinate me. Before you think me masochistic, let me explain. I think they make great stories and can teach you a lot about a person. I can remember in detail how I received almost all of my scars. I love hearing how other people received their scars, yet it’s not usually appropriate to ask people such things. Recently I had a chance to learn about a unique scar when my office hosted a family fun night for community members attending our La Escuelita Program.

Loma Linda Professors Launch Updated, Free Smoking Cessation Program

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What's your normal?

Last week I was working my office when a student came in and asked that I unlock a side room. He commented that I was working late that night. I glanced at the clock saw that it was only 6:45 p.m. and  thought to myself, this is still early. I replied to the student that these were normal work hours for me. Nothing about that conversation was extraordinary, yet I found myself thinking back to it hours later. That is my normal. This is undoubtedly a similar to many of my colleagues. Our work culture can be pretty intense.

Mental Illness... Isn't it Ironic?

I’m going to start this by saying this is probably one of the most terrifying things I’ve done or will do. But it needs to be done.

Robin Williams committed suicide yesterday. As soon as I found out (one of my best friends and my mom both texted me at the exact same time to tell me), I broke down crying. I’m thankful that I was alone at work and was able to do so in relative peace.

Loma Linda Research: Vegetarian Diets Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Increase Health

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#WeSurvivedTyphoonGlenda

Born and raised in the South, I’ve been through my fair share of crazy weather. Tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, you name it, and I can tell you the Twitter hashtags and safety procedures that go with them. Basements, for example–as soon as you know there’s a tornado coming, you head to the lowest part of whatever building you’re in, and you avoid windows. If you don’t have a basement, a bathtub is a good second choice. If you live in an upstairs apartment, you hope and pray that your downstairs neighbors are home and willing to let you hang out with them until the storm passes.

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