A Seventh-day Adventist Organization

History

Since 1948, the Loma Linda University School of Public Health has undergone several important changes to become who we are today.

2014

January 1

The School of Public Health Now…

On January 1, 2014, the School of Public Health reshaped eight public health concentrations by establishing three collaborative centers. This revolutionary approach to public health education creates interdisciplinary opportunities that benefit both students and the communities we wish to serve. Students are able to learn across many different concentrations and get equipped with the tools needed to be successful in a public health career.


1948

April 1

The School of Public Health in the Past...

A Public Health School is Born

In the mid-1940s, interest for a school of tropical medicine began to form following an increase of missionaries and ministers working abroad. Two doctors, Dr. Bruce Halstead and Dr. Harold Mozar, submitted a proposal to the board of trustees at what was formerly known as the College of Medical Evangelists.  Their proposal was approved in 1946 and the School of Tropical and Preventive Medicine opened on April 1, 1948.

1964

September 1

MPH Degrees Offered at the School of Public Health

In 1961, the School of Tropical and Preventive Medicine began to offer master’s degree programs. Three years later, the Loma Linda University School of Public Health was established on September 1, 1964, becoming the third public health school in California.

1967

July 1

APHA Accredited

The school opened its doors for instruction on July 1, 1967, the same day it obtained its accreditation from the American Public Health Association (APHA). At the time, four majors were offered:

  • Tropical Health
  • Public Health Education
  • Public Health Nutrition
  • Public Health Administration

1978

Curriculum Changes, Name Changes

The School of Public Health was changed to the School of Health on September 14, 1970 to include studies of the Seventh-day Adventist lifestyle in the curriculum. In 1978, when lifestyle studies were included in the School of Public Health’s curriculum, the School underwent a final name change, and adopted its previous name as the School of Public Health.